7 Reasons to move from South Africa to New Zealand

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reasons to move from south africa to new zealandIn the 2017/2018 financial year, more than 5,000 South Africans left for New Zealand. Our guess is that their reasons to move from South Africa to New Zealand, while unique to each person, shared some distinct similarities.

Today, we’ll discuss these similarities, which range from the countries sharing a similar culture to the high standard of education children receive in New Zealand.

1. New Zealand is familiar

South Africa and New Zealand are alike in many ways. The culture is similar, many values are shared, and both countries have good weather and a great love for the outdoors. New Zealand can also match South Africa when it comes to breathtaking scenery.

It also helps that English is spoken in New Zealand, so South Africans going over won’t have problems communicating with locals. It is much harder to adapt to life in a new country when you can’t speak the local language!

2. It is one of the safest countries in the world

No country is without crime, but New Zealand does much better than South Africa in safety indexes. For instance, in the 2018 Global Peace Index, New Zealand came in second after only Iceland.

In comparison South Africa slipped down one spot in 2018 to sit at number 125 out of 163 countries.

New Zealand also scores well in the SafeAround Safety Index with a score of 91%. This score is helped by the fact that women travelers are safer in New Zealand than in most other countries around the world. These countries include the USA and Canada.

3. New Zealand’s economy is doing well

The South African economy advanced 1.1% year-on-year in the third quarter of 2018. In contrast, the New Zealand GDP grew 2.6% year-on-year in the same period.

This good growth, although lower than originally forecasted, stimulate the job market. New Zealand’s unemployment rate at the end of 2018 was only 4.3%, while South Africa was struggling with an unemployment rate of 27.1%.

4. Plenty of job opportunities

South Africans are known as hard workers and sought-after employees the world over. If you have the right skills, qualifications and experience, you are bound to find a job in New Zealand.

5. Access to excellent healthcare

New Zealand’s healthcare is among the best in the world. The public healthcare system ensures that all residents have access to free or heavily-subsidised hospital care. According to the OECD Better Life Index, New Zealanders have a life expectancy of 82 years, which is two years above the OECD average.

Please note: in order to access public healthcare, migrants must have New Zealand residency status.

6. Children get a world-class education

In 2017, New Zealand was ranked the best in the world for ‘preparing students for the future’. New Zealand also fares well in the OECD’s Better Life Index with the average student scoring 506 in reading literacy, maths and sciences. This is above the OECD average of 486.

Parents agree that New Zealand’s education standards are exceptional. Expats ranked New Zealand’s school quality at number 10 out of 31 countries in the latest Expat Explorer Survey. South Africa came in at number 21.

7. It’s not as expensive as you might think

While it’s true that New Zealand is not the cheapest place to live in the world, it’s not as expensive as many people think. In fact, the cost of living in New Zealand is dropping relative to many other countries.

In the 2018 Mercer Cost of Living Index, Auckland dropped to number 81 on the list while Wellington dropped to number 101. This makes it more affordable cities to live in than Berlin, at number 71, and London, at number 19.

Keep in mind that even though the cost of living might be more expensive than in South Africa, you get to live in a beautiful country with good public services. New Zealanders are also known for favouring a healthy work-life balance, so it’s safe to say that life will be good in the Land of the Long White Cloud.

Eager to explore your chances of working and living in New Zealand? Book your free initial immigration assessment today!

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